A Guide to Safe Practice in Art & Design

7.10   Working with Scrap Materials

Scrap materials are often used in schools, particularly for three-dimensional work. They are a cheap means of extending the range of activities and encouraging creative adaptation. They also raise consciousness of ecological issues and recycling. There are, however, obvious hazards related to storage, manipulation and processing.

7.10.1    Handling, Shaping and Cutting
7.10.2    Treating Surfaces
7.10.3    Personal Hygiene
7.10.4    Storage
 

7.10.1    Handling, Shaping and Cutting

These processes, along with joining and dismantling, are all potentially hazardous and care should be taken to ensure that materials and objects are held securely and handled with care in an appropriate working environment.

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7.10.2    Treating Surfaces

Treating surfaces that are already painted, dyed or covered with unknown materials should also be done carefully. Since little will be known about the composition of such surface materials, burning or the application of other chemicals can cause hazardous reactions.

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7.10.3    Personal Hygiene

Hands should be thoroughly washed after working. Appropriate personal protective clothing should be worn and care taken to avoid inhalation or ingestion of unknown substances.

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7.10.4    Storage

Storage of scrap materials should be considered as part of normal 'housekeeping', and regular clear-outs should be made.

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