Artists
Lorraine Berry
Lorraine Berry
www.lorraineberry.com

Lorraine trained as a sculptor at the University of Lancaster and creates site-specific installations using new media technology . Her work has been exhibited in Barcelona, Liverpool, Manchester, Edinburgh and throughout the North West. Her practice raises questions as to the nature of reality and perception and often uses illusion, interactivity and visual awareness as a means of challenging preconceptions. Her themes look at issues of identity and humanity and she often works with com-munity groups, schools, museums and galleries to produce installations and interventions that often draw on the character of the site to add additional layers of meaning to engage the viewer through an element of discovery.

Lorraine uses a range of technologies when she is developing her ideas these include digital re-search using the internet, collecting site specific information using a digital camera and or video and sometimes sketches to map a particular location. She then uses Photoshop or other appropriate software as a digital sketchbook to further develop ideas maintaining that the technology gives her control over the manipulation of images enabling her to visualise how she can make things happen. In some pieces, she has created images using fingerprint powder, which leaves only the trace of an image until stimulated by UV light. Lorraine uses this technique as a metaphor for uncovering what lies beneath the surface.

Two projects using this technique, 'Angel' and 'Return Visit.'

Angel


'Angel' was originally produced for St Philips in Salford but subsequently shown in Barcelona. The gallery in Barcelona was a converted convent, the name of which translated as the 'Chapel of Angels'. This inspired a later installation for the Chapel Gallery in Ormskirk.

Angel

Title: Angel
Dimensions: 54 inches x 64 inches
Media: Lasermarked ceramic tiles, fingerprint powder, UV

Site specific piece for St. Philip's in Salford. The image of an Angel created from fingerprint pow-der appeared in the floor as the viewer approached the altar.

'Angel' was a site-specific piece produced for St. Philip's in Salford. The image of an Angel was laser marked into ceramic tiles, then dusted with fingerprint powder. Fingerprint powder leaves only the trace of an image until stimulated by UV light. These tiles were then laid over the existing tiles in front of the altar and a UV light support was constructed in the style of a lower level altar rail. The UV lighting was activated by a sensor as the viewer walked towards the altar.

'Chapel of Angels' was a site specific installation for the Chapel Gallery in Ormskirk. The Gallery used to be a Methodist Chapel. Invisible images created from fingerprint powder were screen-printed onto the walls and structures of the Gallery. Viewers entered an apparently empty gallery and were provided with UV handscanners so that they could search for the Angels in the walls.

Chapel of Angels



Return Visit



Return Visit

Title: Return Visit
Media: Fingerprint powder images, UV scanners & sound.

The work looks at the impact of the textile industry on the lives of individuals and touches on the broader artistic theme of how people's lives and choices are governed by the time into which they are born.

Concentrating on the experiences of three generations of a family from Lancashire who worked in the textile industry, the work combines images created from fingerprint powder with recorded reminiscences.

These recorded reminiscences were then incorporated into the installation, activated by sensor. This gave the installation a real sense of history and the passing of time. As the viewer scans photo-graphic images of the family in their youth, they hear the family's voices talking about their own experiences and the experiences of family members who have been loved and lost. The installation also incorporated other text-based pieces using anonymous reminiscences and representing the many other silent voices whose lives indicate shared experience.

Lorraine Berry has an interest in forensic science techniques using them as a metaphor for uncover-ing what lies beneath the surface. Images and text created from fingerprint powder will be sus-pended in the work areas of the Mill.

Fingerprint powder leaves only the trace of an image until stimulated by UV light and UV handheld scanners will be made available to members of the public. As the viewer scans photographic images of the family in their youth, they will hear the family's voices talking about their own experiences and the experiences of family members who have been loved and lost. Other text-based pieces will use anonymous reminiscences representing the many other silent voices whose lives indicate shared experiences.

By interacting with the installation, the viewer is made aware of the reality of the history of this and the many other mills in Lancashire and how this history impacted on individual lives at a very per-sonal level. In a broader artistic sense the installation looks at themes such as personal choice and shared experience. This site specific installation also touches upon the more universal themes of the passage of time, what's lost and what's been left behind.



Digital technology gives Lorraine complete control over the manipulation of an image with the technology being used to explore and create forms which reference the real world but are the prod-uct of a digital process. In 'Angels' for example the images are more than just single photographs of statues they are composed using elements from different images with the technology being used to create create an idealised form that relates to her original intention.

Again In the 'Horrocks' project the images of the planets are more than modified photographs they were created using different layers and effects in photoshop.

In many cases her use of the technology in not immediately evident. In 'Return Visit' the images of the textile workers that are uncovered by the ultra violet light have been enhanced to bring out the textural qualities.

Other work includes introducing artificial reflections into museum display cases, producing a 'Tele-scope Trail' of 52 sculptural telescopes (each containing a digital image produced by local school-children), creating an animated DVD of star images for projection. In 'Conversations', interactive images were located at opposite ends of the Bacup Town Centre. These images were cam-ouflaged into their setting and were only really noticeable when sensors were activated by passersby. The images reflected the strong sense of community and history in Bacup and changed colour or appeared and disappeared as sensors were activated. Thus as people went about their daily lives, past and present 'blinked' at each other across the Town Centre.

Lorraine's work is very much about the experience of Art, using the experience to draw the viewer in, but its aim is to encourage people to look beyond the surface and consider the bigger questions in life.